For RASCALS, There’s Nothing Trivial About This Trivia Fundraiser Night

fundraiser

Dear RASCALS,

The family and friends of Robert A. (Bob) Stehlin, founder of the RASCALS Foundation, are hosting a Trivia Night, Saturday, September 6, 2014, in an effort to raise monies to assist his family with the financial burdens that ALS has placed on them over the past 5 years. Julie Tristan will be the Emcee for the evening.

As Bob continues to battle for his life, the rising costs of caregivers and healthcare equipment are really taking a toll on family finances.  The family has realized that they cannot go it alone and are reaching out to ask for assistance in their personal fight against ALS.

The Board of the RASCALS Foundation understands all too well the stresses placed on the victims of ALS, the patient and family. So we are thrilled to promote this family fund raising event to friends of the RASCALS Foundation.

We hope that the foundation’s followers will support the family in their important fundraising efforts.  We have witnessed just how generous you RASCALS can be, and know just how special you are when asked to support a great cause!

In order to support rather than compete with the Stehlin family fundraiser, we are announcing that the the RASCALS Foundation will defer its own fund raising activities for the remainder of 2014.  We hope that this action will provide the Stehlin’s family and friends with an opportunity to show their support for the struggling family.

The RASCALS Foundation mission will continue with scholarship applications being reviewed in August with awards granted in September 2014.   Monies previously raised and held in reserve will assist in funding ALS research efforts in 2014 and plans are underway for a strong 2015.

Contact Laura at 314-705-1994 or email laurambarrett@yahoo.com with questions.

Hope to see you at the Robert A. Stehin Family Benefit – Trivia Night!!
Trivia • Basket Raffles • 50/50 Raffle • plus Silent Auction

The Theme: Remember the 80′s

The Cause: Benefiting the Robert Stehlin Family. 100% of the proceeds will go directly to the family to help to cover medical expenses for the care of Bob Stehlin who is battling ALS.

The Time: Doors open at 6pm – Trivia starts at 7pm

The Place: Imperial Elks Lodge, 1515 Miller Road, Imperial, Missouri  63052 [MAP]

Reserve your table by simply paying on Paypal using laurambarrett@yahoo.com. A confirmation will be sent back to you. Please include your email address and the table name.

Tables will most likely sell out fast and will not be available for purchase the night of the event.

Table of 8: $150.00

Individual: $20 per person

Free beer and soda. Cash bar available.

Gift Basket Donations: The raffling of gift baskets raises significant funds for the trivia night.  The Stehlin family needs your help in identifying gift basket donations by making personal appeals to friends, families, and business contacts who have potential services or products to donate.

Since storage of gift baskets prior to the event is a challenge for the family, it would be greatly appreciated if baskets are brought to the trivia event itself.  However, limited storage is available for those baskets that must be submitted prior to the event.

Until we meet again, peace.

Sincerely,

Laura Barrett, Michael Brand, Melissa Marr, and Sandra Putney

75 Years Ago: Lou Gehrig Diagnosed with Disease that Now Bears His Name

Following a difficult start to the 1939 baseball season, Lou Gehrig visited the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota in June of that year. Doctors there felt certain that the Yankees captain and  future Hall of Famer was struggling due to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).  The diagnosis was confirmed on June 19, his 36th birthday. He would never play baseball again.

The following is excerpted from the Official Website of Lou Gehrig:

In 1938, Gehrig fell below .300 for the first time since 1925 and it was clear that there was something wrong. He lacked his usual strength. Pitches he would have hit for home runs were only flyouts. Doctors diagnosed a gall bladder problem first, and they put him on a bland diet, which only made him weaker. Teammate Wes Ferrell noticed that on the golf course, instead of wearing golf cleats, Gehrig was wearing tennis shoes and sliding his feet along the ground. Ferrell was frightened. When asked if he would remove Gehrig from the lineup, manager Joe McCarthy said, “That’s Lou’s decision.”

Gehrig played the first eight games of the 1939 season, but he managed only four hits. On a ball hit back to pitcher Johnny Murphy, Gehrig had trouble getting to first in time for the throw. When he returned to the dugout, his teammates complimented him on the “good play.” Gehrig knew when his fellow Yankees had to congratulate him for stumbling into an average catch it was time to leave. He took himself out of the game. On May 2, 1939, as Yankee captain, he took the lineup card to the umpires, as usual. But his name was not on the roster. Babe Dahlgren was stationed at first. The game announcer intoned, “Ladies and gentlemen, Lou Gehrig’s consecutive streak of 2,130 games played has ended.”

lou and dizzy

The great Lou Gehrig with the St. Louis Cardinals’ phenom pitcher, Dizzy Dean.

# # #

The Robert A. Stehlin Campaign for ALS (R.A.S.C.A.L.S.) is an all-volunteer 501(c)(3) charity. 100% of all funds raised go to building awareness, treatment research and development, plus ALS family assistance. There are no administrative costs.

Contributions are tax-deductible.

You may also be interested in visiting the RASCALS Store.

The material presented here is for informational purposes only and should not be construed as medical advice, or relied upon as a substitute for medical advice from a health care provider.

Sign Up to Give RASCALS a Helping Hand at Big Charity Poker Tournament

cbs sports insiidestl600_Fortune_Header

Bottle_FortuneCBS Sports Radio 920 and InsideSTL invite you to be their guest for their first Annual Charity Poker Classic presented by Miller Fortune at Lucas Park Grille on June 18th @ 6PM

Join us for food & drinks from Lucas Park and Miller Fortune, plus a fabulous night of poker and celebrities to benefit a number of great St. Louis charity causes. Bring your friends. You won’t want to miss this!

Your $50 tournament buy-in will be donated to charity. Tournament players will receive a free appetizer buffet, discounted Miller Fortune, raffle prizes and more.

Play for a good cause along side former St. Louis Cardinal great Jimmy Edmonds, the cast of The Ryan Kelley Morning After, other CBS Sports 920 personalities, LUX from 105.7 The Point, Josh Wills from the St. Louis band Story of the Year, Larry Nickel, and St. Louis’ own Dan Chandler from Evans Blue and MANY more.

The grand prize winner of the tournament will receive a Grand Prize pack including Miller Fortune prizes, Lucas Park gift certificates, Gift Cards, event and concert tickets and MORE.

 

WHERE: Lucas Park Grille

WHEN: Wednesday, June 18th starting @ 6PM

TO REGISTER: Email Poker@insideSTL.com with
your contact info to secure your spot.

100% of the proceeds from the event will go to charity including:

 

Presented by:

insidestlarch

# # #

The Robert A. Stehlin Campaign for ALS (R.A.S.C.A.L.S.) is an all-volunteer 501(c)(3) charity. 100% of all funds raised go to building awareness, treatment research and development, plus ALS family assistance. There are no administrative costs.

Contributions are tax-deductible.

You may also be interested in visiting the RASCALS Store.

The material presented here is for informational purposes only and should not be construed as medical advice, or relied upon as a substitute for medical advice from a health care provider.

ALS Awareness Fact: Day 31

Fact: Building Awareness of ALS Remains Important

Many in the ALS community are frustrated. Completely understandable

After all, Jean-Martin Charcot and Alex Joffroy began their in-depth studies of ALS nearly 150 years ago. Still  no cure. Still no effective treatments.

And while great strides have been made in the last couple of years alone, ALS survivors, patients, and those dedicated to developing treatments are still not getting the recognition they deserve.

It is this reality that leads some to lament that ‘talk is cheap.’ In truth, talking is absolutely essential in bringing public attention to ALS. It’s vital to unraveling the mystery of ALS and its progression. Talk is critical to developing treatments. It’s crucial to finding a cure. Why?

Because all the advances to date were made possible by people that knew about ALS. And clearly, not nearly enough do. ALS remains the most famous and fatal disease that no one’s ever heard of.

That needs to change if we’re going to fund the work to find a cure.

So we all need to talk LOUDER. Keep preaching and keep teaching.

SPREAD THE MESSAGE!

Make some noise. Make some time to volunteer. Make a donation.

And if you can’t send money, send some encouragement, or simply a prayer.

The truth is that the ALS community needs all the help it can get. Not just during ALS Awareness Month in May, but 365 days a year.

#

In addition to raising awareness, we also work to raise much-needed financial resources for the ALS community.

You can make a secure online donation via PayPal here, or mail your gift here:

RASCALS Foundation

P.O. Box 31834

St. Louis, MO 63131

How is your money used?

RESEARCH GRANTS

On your behalf, RASCALS has made annual contributions to ALS research centers so they can keep searching for answers and treatments.

The Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology Services Group of St. Louis University was a 2013 recipient.

HIGHER EDUCATION SCHOLARSHIPS

The financial burdens of ALS are as horrific as the disease itself. So each year we present college scholarships to members of families affected by ALS.

The scholarship awards are based in part on applicants’ original essays that address “How ALS Has Influenced My Life.”

RASCALS GIVES 100%

The Robert A. Stehlin Campaign for ALS (R.A.S.C.A.L.S.) is an all-volunteer 501(c)(3) charity.

You can be sure that 100%  of every dollar that you donate  goes to building awareness, treatment research and development, plus ALS family assistance.

#

This is ALS Awareness Month. Please make it a point to tell someone about ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Thank you for all you do.

ALS Awareness Facts: Day 30

Fact: There are people in whom ALS has stopped progressing and a small number of people in whom the symptoms of ALS reversed

Hopefully one day soon every patient’s symptoms will be reversed, and ALS itself erased from the planet. But we need your help.

#

The RASCALS Foundation is doing everything it can year-round to spread the message about Lou Gehrig’s disease. In reality, this is everybody’s disease—and there is so much more to do.

In addition to raising awareness, we also work to raise much-needed financial resources for the ALS community.

You can make a secure online donation via PayPal here, or mail your gift here:

RASCALS Foundation

P.O. Box 31834

St. Louis, MO 63131

How is your money used?

RESEARCH GRANTS

On your behalf, RASCALS has made annual contributions to ALS research centers so they can keep searching for answers and treatments.

The Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology Services Group of St. Louis University was a 2013 recipient.

HIGHER EDUCATION SCHOLARSHIPS

The financial burdens of ALS are as horrific as the disease itself. So each year we present college scholarships to members of families affected by ALS.

The scholarship awards are based in part on applicants’ original essays that address “How ALS Has Influenced My Life.”

RASCALS GIVES 100%

The Robert A. Stehlin Campaign for ALS (R.A.S.C.A.L.S.) is an all-volunteer 501(c)(3) charity.

You can be sure that 100%  of every dollar that you donate  goes to building awareness, treatment research and development, plus ALS family assistance.

#

This is ALS Awareness Month. Please make it a point to tell someone about ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Thank you for all you do.

ALS Awareness Facts: Day 29

Fact: Greater than 50% of all persons with ALS live more than 3 years after diagnosis

Although the life expectancy of an ALS patient averages about 2-5 years from the time of diagnosis, this disease is variable and many people live with quality for 5 years and more.

Of all patients, more than half live more than three years after diagnosis.

About twenty percent of people with ALS live 5 years or more.

Up to ten percent will survive more than 10 years.

Five percent will live 20 years.

#

The RASCALS Foundation is doing everything it can year-round to spread the message about Lou Gehrig’s disease. In reality, this is everybody’s disease—and there is so much more to do.

In addition to raising awareness, we also work to raise much-needed financial resources for the ALS community.

You can make a secure online donation via PayPal here, or mail your gift here:

RASCALS Foundation

P.O. Box 31834

St. Louis, MO 63131

How is your money used?

RESEARCH GRANTS

On your behalf, RASCALS has made annual contributions to ALS research centers so they can keep searching for answers and treatments.

The Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology Services Group of St. Louis University was a 2013 recipient.

HIGHER EDUCATION SCHOLARSHIPS

The financial burdens of ALS are as horrific as the disease itself. So each year we present college scholarships to members of families affected by ALS.

The scholarship awards are based in part on applicants’ original essays that address “How ALS Has Influenced My Life.”

RASCALS GIVES 100%

The Robert A. Stehlin Campaign for ALS (R.A.S.C.A.L.S.) is an all-volunteer 501(c)(3) charity.

You can be sure that 100%  of every dollar that you donate  goes to building awareness, treatment research and development, plus ALS family assistance.

#

This is ALS Awareness Month. Please make it a point to tell someone about ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Thank you for all you do.

ALS Awareness Facts: Day 28

 Fact: No single laboratory test or procedure can establish the diagnosis of Lou Gehrig’s disease

The patient’s medical history, physical examination, and neurological examination are usually sufficient to suggest the diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

However, it is still important to conduct a full investigation to exclude other conditions and to permit a detailed understanding of the areas involved by the disease.

Since no single laboratory test or procedure can establish the diagnosis, every effort must be made to be certain that a treatable condition resembling ALS is not overlooked. A complete diagnostic workup usually includes most, if not all, of the following tests and procedures:

  • Electrodiagnostic tests
  • Laboratory tests and procedures
  • X-ray and imaging studies
  • Muscle biopsy

#

The RASCALS Foundation is doing everything it can year-round to spread the message about Lou Gehrig’s disease. In reality, this is everybody’s disease—and there is so much more to do.

In addition to raising awareness, we also work to raise much-needed financial resources for the ALS community.

You can make a secure online donation via PayPal here, or mail your gift here:

RASCALS Foundation

P.O. Box 31834

St. Louis, MO 63131

How is your money used?

RESEARCH GRANTS

On your behalf, RASCALS has made annual contributions to ALS research centers so they can keep searching for answers and treatments.

The Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology Services Group of St. Louis University was a 2013 recipient.

HIGHER EDUCATION SCHOLARSHIPS

The financial burdens of ALS are as horrific as the disease itself. So each year we present college scholarships to members of families affected by ALS.

The scholarship awards are based in part on applicants’ original essays that address “How ALS Has Influenced My Life.”

RASCALS GIVES 100%

The Robert A. Stehlin Campaign for ALS (R.A.S.C.A.L.S.) is an all-volunteer 501(c)(3) charity.

You can be sure that 100%  of every dollar that you donate  goes to building awareness, treatment research and development, plus ALS family assistance.

#

This is ALS Awareness Month. Please make it a point to tell someone about ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Thank you for all you do.

ALS Awareness Facts: Day 27

Fact: While advances have been made in understanding how ALS works, the community still struggles to know why

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, part of the National Institutes of Health, is the Federal Government’s leading supporter of biomedical research on ALS. The goals of this research are to find the cause or causes of ALS, understand the mechanisms involved in the progression of the disease, and develop effective treatment.

Scientists are seeking to understand the mechanisms that trigger selective motor neurons to degenerate in ALS and to find effective approaches to halt the processes leading to cell death. This work includes studies in animals to identify the means by which SOD1 mutations lead to the destruction of neurons.

The excessive accumulation of free radicals, which has been implicated in a number of neurodegenerative diseases including ALS, is also being closely studied. In addition, researchers are examining how the loss of neurotrophic factors may be involved in ALS. Neurotrophic factors are chemicals found in the brain and spinal cord that play a vital role in the development, specification, maintenance, and protection of neurons.

Studying how these factors may be lost and how such a loss may contribute to motor neuron degeneration may lead to a greater understanding of ALS and the development of neuroprotective strategies. By exploring these and other possible factors, researchers hope to find the cause or causes of motor neuron degeneration in ALS and develop therapies to slow the progression of the disease.

Researchers are also conducting investigations to increase their understanding of the role of programmed cell death or apoptosis in ALS. In normal physiological processes, apoptosis acts as a means to rid the body of cells that are no longer needed by prompting the cells to commit “cell suicide.” The critical balance between necessary cell death and the maintenance of essential cells is thought to be controlled by trophic factors. In addition to ALS, apoptosis is pervasive in other chronic neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease and is thought to be a major cause of the secondary brain damage seen after stroke and trauma. Discovering what triggers apoptosis may eventually lead to therapeutic interventions for ALS and other neurological diseases.

Scientists have not yet identified a reliable biological marker for ALS—a biochemical abnormality shared by all patients with the disease. Once such a biomarker is discovered and tests are developed to detect the marker in patients, allowing early detection and diagnosis of ALS, physicians will have a valuable tool to help them follow the effects of new therapies and monitor disease progression.

NINDS-supported researchers are studying families with ALS who lack the SOD1 mutation to locate additional genes that cause the disease. Identification of additional ALS genes will allow genetic testing useful for diagnostic confirmation of ALS and prenatal screening for the disease. This work with familial ALS could lead to a greater understanding of sporadic ALS as well.

Because familial ALS is virtually indistinguishable from sporadic ALS clinically, some researchers believe that familial ALS genes may also be involved in the manifestations of the more common sporadic form of ALS. Scientists also hope to identify genetic risk factors that predispose people to sporadic ALS.

Potential therapies for ALS are being investigated in animal models. Some of this work involves experimental treatments with normal SOD1 and other antioxidants. In addition, neurotrophic factors are being studied for their potential to protect motor neurons from pathological degeneration. Investigators are optimistic that these and other basic research studies will eventually lead to treatments for ALS.

Results of an NINDS-sponsored phase III randomized, placebo-controlled trial of the drug minocycline to treat ALS were reported in 2007. This study showed that people with ALS who received minocycline had a 25 percent greater rate of decline than those who received the placebo, according to the ALS functional rating scale (ALSFRS-R).

#

Clearly the ALS community still has a long way to go to finding a cure, or even effective treatment options. There is so much more to do. That’s why fundraising is such an important part of what we do here at the RASCALS Foundation.

In addition to raising awareness, we also work to raise much-needed financial resources for the ALS community.

You can make a secure online donation via PayPal here, or mail your gift here:

RASCALS Foundation

P.O. Box 31834

St. Louis, MO 63131

How is your money used?

RESEARCH GRANTS

On your behalf, RASCALS has made annual contributions to ALS research centers so they can keep searching for answers and treatments.

The Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology Services Group of St. Louis University was a 2013 recipient.

HIGHER EDUCATION SCHOLARSHIPS

The financial burdens of ALS are as horrific as the disease itself. So each year we present college scholarships to members of families affected by ALS.

The scholarship awards are based in part on applicants’ original essays that address “How ALS Has Influenced My Life.”

RASCALS GIVES 100%

The Robert A. Stehlin Campaign for ALS (R.A.S.C.A.L.S.) is an all-volunteer 501(c)(3) charity.

You can be sure that 100%  of every dollar that you donate  goes to building awareness, treatment research and development, plus ALS family assistance.

#

This is ALS Awareness Month. Please make it a point to tell someone about ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Thank you for all you do.

ALS Awareness Facts: Day 26

Pact: Physical therapy and special equipment can enhance patients’ independence and safety throughout the course of ALS

Gentle, low-impact aerobic exercise such as walking, swimming, and stationary bicycling can strengthen unaffected muscles, improve cardiovascular health, and help patients fight fatigue and depression.

Range of motion and stretching exercises can help prevent painful spasticity and shortening (contracture) of muscles. Physical therapists can recommend exercises that provide these benefits without overworking muscles. Occupational therapists can suggest devices such as ramps, braces, walkers, and wheelchairs that help patients conserve energy and remain mobile.

When the muscles that assist in breathing weaken, use of nocturnal ventilatory assistance (intermittent positive pressure ventilation [IPPV] or bilevel positive airway pressure [BIPAP]) may be used to aid breathing during sleep.

Such devices artificially inflate the patient’s lungs from various external sources that are applied directly to the face or body. When muscles are no longer able to maintain oxygen and carbon dioxide levels, these devices may be used full-time.

Patients may eventually consider forms of mechanical ventilation (respirators) in which a machine inflates and deflates the lungs. To be effective, this may require a tube that passes from the nose or mouth to the windpipe (trachea) and for long-term use, an operation such as a tracheostomy, in which a plastic breathing tube is inserted directly in the patient’s windpipe through an opening in the neck.

Patients and their families should consider several factors when deciding whether and when to use one of these options.

Ventilation devices differ in their effect on the patient’s quality of life and in cost. Although ventilation support can ease problems with breathing and prolong survival, it does not affect the progression of ALS.

Patients need to be fully informed about these considerations and the long-term effects of life without movement before they make decisions about ventilation support.

#

The RASCALS Foundation is doing everything it can year-round to spread the message about Lou Gehrig’s disease. In reality, this is everybody’s disease—and there is so much more to do.

In addition to raising awareness, we also work to raise much-needed financial resources for the ALS community.

You can make a secure online donation via PayPal here, or mail your gift here:

RASCALS Foundation

P.O. Box 31834

St. Louis, MO 63131

How is your money used?

RESEARCH GRANTS

On your behalf, RASCALS has made annual contributions to ALS research centers so they can keep searching for answers and treatments.

The Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology Services Group of St. Louis University was a 2013 recipient.

HIGHER EDUCATION SCHOLARSHIPS

The financial burdens of ALS are as horrific as the disease itself. So each year we present college scholarships to members of families affected by ALS.

The scholarship awards are based in part on applicants’ original essays that address “How ALS Has Influenced My Life.”

RASCALS GIVES 100%

The Robert A. Stehlin Campaign for ALS (R.A.S.C.A.L.S.) is an all-volunteer 501(c)(3) charity.

You can be sure that 100%  of every dollar that you donate  goes to building awareness, treatment research and development, plus ALS family assistance.

#

This is ALS Awareness Month. Please make it a point to tell someone about ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Thank you for all you do.

ALS Awareness Facts: Day 25

Fact: There are presently no treatments to effectively slow or halt disease progression of ALS

Current treatment of ALS is aimed at symptomatic relief, prevention of complications and maintenance of maximum optimal function and optimal quality of life.

Most of this, in the later stages, requires nursing management of a patient who is alert but functionally quadriplegic with intact sensory function and bedridden.

Riluzole, the first treatment to alter the course of ALS, was approved by the FDA in late 1995. This antiglutamate drug was shown scientifically to prolong the life of persons with ALS by at least a few months.

More recent studies suggest Riluzole slows the progress of ALS, allowing the patient more time in the higher functioning states when their function is less affected by ALS.

Reports from three separate patient databases described long range experience with Riluzole. All three reports suggest a trend of increasing survival with Riluzole over time.

More studies are needed to confirm these database observations. The trend appears to indicate that longer periods of time than those used in the Riluzole clinical trials may be needed to see the long-term survival advantage of the drug.

Click here for more information on the drug. Rilutek® (Riluzole) is manufactured by Sanofi-Aventis Pharmaceuticals, who sponsor a Patient Assistance Program that helps patients who qualify receive the drug.

Many private health plans cover the cost of Riluzole. Further information on Riluzole coverage through Medicare Prescription Drug Benefit can be found in the Advocacy pages of this website.

#

 

The RASCALS Foundation is doing everything it can year-round to spread the message about Lou Gehrig’s disease. In reality, this is everybody’s disease—and there is so much more to do.

In addition to raising awareness, we also work to raise much-needed financial resources for the ALS community.

You can make a secure online donation via PayPal here, or mail your gift here:

RASCALS Foundation

P.O. Box 31834

St. Louis, MO 63131

How is your money used?

RESEARCH GRANTS

On your behalf, RASCALS has made annual contributions to ALS research centers so they can keep searching for answers and treatments.

The Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology Services Group of St. Louis University was a 2013 recipient.

HIGHER EDUCATION SCHOLARSHIPS

The financial burdens of ALS are as horrific as the disease itself. So each year we present college scholarships to members of families affected by ALS.

The scholarship awards are based in part on applicants’ original essays that address “How ALS Has Influenced My Life.”

RASCALS GIVES 100%

The Robert A. Stehlin Campaign for ALS (R.A.S.C.A.L.S.) is an all-volunteer 501(c)(3) charity.

You can be sure that 100%  of every dollar that you donate  goes to building awareness, treatment research and development, plus ALS family assistance.

#

This is ALS Awareness Month. Please make it a point to tell someone about ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Thank you for all you do.