ALS Toxicity Reduced in Animal Models

In a new study published in Nature Genetics, University of Pennsylvania researchers and colleagues have made inroads into the mechanism by which ALS acts. Working with a powerful fruit fly model of the disease, they found a way of reducing disease toxicity that slows the dysfunction of neurons and showing that a parallel mechanism can reduce toxicity in mammalian cells. Their discoveries offer the possibility of a new strategy for treating ALS.

2 New Genes Linked to ALS and Related Disorders

Recognition that the mutations adversely impact regulation of RNA could lead to targeted therapy to correct the problem. The mutation’s location in the prion-like domain might also prove significant. Although the mutations in hnRNPA2B1 or hnRNPA1 appear to be rare, hundreds of other RNA-binding proteins have prion-like domains. Taylor said patients with unexplained neurodegenerative diseases may have mutations in these proteins.

On the Front Lines of ALS Research

Scientists hope that by creating models of disease in different animals—from flies to reprogrammed human stem cells—research will converge on an answer, or multiple answers. “I think you have to use all these models, with different mutations, in the hopes that there will be one that really does provide the breakthrough,” says Maniatis. For patients and families, that breakthrough can’t come soon enough.